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Tutorials to come back to by spselfr




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January 21, 2009
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Thus begins a diatribe on safety and education in the world of makeup and special effects.  Many products, including many “non-toxic” products, are not necessarily safe for use on the body.   Many products that can be safely used on small areas of the body are not necessarily safe for full-body use.  This article will begin and lead into a series designed to help inform and educate makeup artists, bodypainters, photographers, and models.  The goal is to help artists make informed choices and avoid making unsafe assumptions in choosing what products are safe to apply to a model’s body!

In an internet-educated, figure-it-out-for-yourself, whatever-goes world of contemporary makeup and special effects, it is easier than ever to find bad, misleading or downright dangerous information spewed out right alongside accurate, well-founded information.  “Internet” is the operative word here, because an eager audience can find information and “evidence” on the internet to “justify” or support anything it wants to.  That doesn’t mean the information is actually true, correct, or safe!   In the world of makeup, bodypainting, and special effects, the most common kinds of misconception and misinformation concern the safety of various products when being applied to the body and/or the face.

Many in this artistic community, myself included, are self-taught. Some of the most famous contemporary geniuses and historic icons of makeup and movie magic have been self-taught. Depending on the creative service offered and where, a license and formal training often is not required. Consider the training and state board certification required to cut hair in a salon, something customers take for granted. Now think of all the state fair face painters, temporary tattoo booths, and makeup artists whose “final exam” was ordering business cards. It is for this reason that mentors and assisting still serves and essential role.  More experienced artists can offer a new artist fundamental knowledge that comes from a wide range of direct personal experience, combined with the education gained through a career in the profession.

“Do I have to use real body paint?” If the person asking wants the answer to be NO, it’s all too easy to throw reason aside, and to look no further than the statements of many people who publicly say, “I used this or this or this, and I’ve never had a problem!” That doesn’t mean there never will be a problem, or there never could be a problem.  It’s essentially a justification for saying, “I got lucky and no one got hurt!”

Artists are fond of the Unique and Bizarre. Covering a person with tree bark, mirrors, grime, glitter, gore and any combination of food is a rite of passage for any portfolio. Special effects use all manner of surgical glue, latex, animal gelatin and silicone. A magic concoction of the industry is PAX – a 50-50 mix of medical adhesive and acrylic paint. This classic paint is still used for prosthetic pieces and tattoo cover in addition to a plethora of specifically designed alternatives.

The thing to note is that all this fun stuff is not, strictly speaking, cosmetic makeup. Choices are made. In a professional artistic environment, those choices are determined by analyzing the look required and reviewing the classic methods for accomplishing that look. Next, a creative artist will figure a way to take that look into a new, fresh direction.

Now here in lies the conundrum for the beginning artist. How did they do that? What did they use to create that look? A little bit of research says, “Acrylic paint is used as an ingredient on Hollywood sets. So, obviously acrylic paint must be safe for skin.  Soooooo, it must be ok to slather a model head to toe in acrylic paint. After all, it’s non-toxic!” These are the kinds of assumptions, often made with the best of intentions, that can cause serious problems and outright harm to the person having such products applied to their body or face!

An artist makes choices that have a direct impact on another person’s health and safety. In the case of shared, communal and double-dipped items like mascara, lipstick and brushes, that decision multiplies exponentially. Pinkeye, cold sores and lice are easy to spread with makeup tools. The only thing that spreads faster is a bad reputation. The artist makes risk/reward decisions for every model they touch.

Underwater, pyrotechnic, aerial shoots and the like have a high degree of difficulty and risk. These risks are mitigated by safety measures, but they will never be as safe as standing on a concrete floor in a studio. Here, the model is very engaged in the risk/reward.  The risks and rewards from various products used on the body are less obvious, but no less real.  But, it makes it harder for the model to have the knowledge necessary to contribute to making the informed decision. Therefore the brunt of the responsibility for the model’s safety falls right back upon the makeup artist/bodypainter.

Now back to the aspiring artist hitting up forums, chats and internet clips for information. It is one thing to watch a self demo on how to make a rainbow out of eye shadow. It is another thing to listen to people guess in writing if it is safe to use craft store paint and markers on skin. It is alarming to hear people cavalierly dismiss professional cosmetic products.

There are many pigments used to make paint. There are very few pigments approved for use in cosmetics. Pearls and glitters expand the gulf between safe and a roll of the dice. As rare as they are, allergic reactions can result in hives or far worse. Complicating the matter further, a cosmetic that is safe for the body may not be advisable for use on the lips or eye area. A perfect example of this is in body paints and black light makeup.

Paints have lots of ingredients besides pretty colors: flex agents, binders, flow enhancers and a delivery medium. Cosmetic ingredients are individually approved by the FDA. The same cannot be said for craft paint. Allergic reactions can include permanent scarring.

Glues and adhesives are a very frequent source of bad reactions. Latex allergies are common. The stronger adhesives require equally strong removers which themselves can irritate.

The most common reason given for not using proper products is price. Someone puts a price on someone else’s safety. In truth, quality professional products are no more expensive than the craft store alternatives. The irony is that non-cosmetic products just do not perform as well. They were never designed, approved or intended for skin.

Non-Toxic is an assessment that a product is not poisonous if ingested. There are many non-toxic things that won’t kill a person, but will still make a person ill enough to be hospitalized. Non-toxic when used as directed…. And it’s almost guaranteed that bodypainting is not a “directed” use of many of these craft paints, markers, and other products.

What about barrier creams? A manufacturer will not be eager to condone use of their product in an off-label manner. And, a salesman at the art store is not necessarily an authoritative voice in this matter. They are in business to sell something, after all.

We all begin our careers as artists by dabbling, breaking rules and finding what works. It is the nature of discovery and experimentation that draws talent to the field in the first place. If we’re lucky, no one got hurt during the learning curve. It is up to the artist to take responsibility for their actions, know their craft, and show respect for their models by making the best choices possible.

_____________________
Photos & Testimonials

Ok. Do you really think an artist is going to hold up a hand and yell for the photographer to take a picture of the model’s allergic reaction? The only photos we are likely to see are as an exhibit in a court case.

That being said, RockstarVanity presents:
The Weapon I Choose by RockstarVanity
“And in case you think it’s a good idea to put lipstick and red food dye anywhere near your eyes, take it from me - it is NOT a good idea. Yes, it makes your eyes look all swollen and puffy and you'll get genuine (allergic) tears streaming down your cheeks but it hurts like hell and I'm not entirely sure it isn't harmful. My eyes are still stinging and it's rather painful. So yeah, don't do it. Cool kids use hypoallergenic effects make-up, not food products.”
More: rockstarvanity.deviantart.com/…

As for myself, I can tell stories.
Here are a few that my Airbrush and Body Paint students have to listen to:

Kid’s Tattoo Markers (soap and water cleanup) have caused more skin reactions than ANY product in my kit (which would be why they are no longer in my kit). Worst reaction was on a child at a birthday party. Her whole body started to itch and her skin was red under the marker. Fortunately for the child AND for me, the party was thrown by a Physician who handled the situation. Child was fine. I was fine after 2 margaritas. This is why I have liability insurance.

Silicone Allergy. I had a model with extensive body paint experience say there was no need to waste time patch testing... Turns out the patch test showed a reaction to a new-on-the-market silicone based body paint. This threw the shoot into a tizzy because my anticipated product could not be used. Fortunately, I had back up products and we recovered. Come to find out, word on the professional street has it that silicone allergies are just as common as latex allergies. This is why I have liability insurance.

Adhesives. I have a model who can attest to a heart made out of red dots that lingered on her derriere after the cute little swarovski crystals were removed. These crystals, sold as “jewel tattoos” were placed on top of about 4 layers of body paint, proving that paint does not make a barrier layer - sometimes it does the exact opposite and acts as a sponge. This is why I have liability insurance.

Sunburn. Body paint does not like sun screen, so application and sun exposure have to be carefully planned. The above model (very pale) sported an inverse sun burn of the Battledress Paint-N-Body logo on her butt cheek. Our set up was in the shade. The promoter decided to parade her around in Southern California August sun for a couple of hours. Another model tried to scrub off a nice Lady Liberty paint after a 4th of July day in Newport Beach. All those red splotches were burns from where the paint was a little on the thin side.

______

Links:

FDA on Novelty Makeup including face paint and black light: www.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/cos10-3…

FDA on Decorative Contact Lenses: www.fda.gov/consumer/updates/d…

FDA on Eye Cosmetics Safety: www.fda.gov/consumer/updates/e…

FDA on Cosmetic Colors: www.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/cos-col…

Model Mayhem’s Hair, Makeup & Styling Forum. Sanitary/Hygienic Precautions: www.modelmayhem.com/po.php?thr…

Model Mayhem’s Hair, Makeup & Styling Forum. Hygiene Horror Stories:
www.modelmayhem.com/po.php?thr…

Supplier Sampling:
Alcone: Makeup supply www.alconeco.com/
FX Supply: Makeup, body paint and Special Effects supply www.fxsupply.com/
Sillyfarm: face and body paint supplies www.sillyfarm.com
Add a Comment:
 
:iconmelesmeles-faber:
melesmeles-faber Featured By Owner Feb 13, 2014  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
This is fascinating! I've been teaching myself how to make latex masks/prosthetics, and also attach them to myself (along with a little beginner face/bodypainting)  I've mainly been using liquid latex to attach the masks, so far no problem.......

When it comes to sellingl some masks, I've been told on occasion, that "can't I make my masks in silicone ?" (because of the latex worry) Well so far I've not had the chance..... But I'm interested to see what you 've said about silicone!

Also on the one occasion I used Ben Nye to attach a prosthetic (and it was a good strong bond) the remover however caused real problems with my skin...... 
Reply
:iconbattledress:
Battledress Featured By Owner Feb 13, 2014  Professional General Artist
There are a lot of different KINDS of Latex.... some are safe for use directly on the skin some are best used just for mold making.
If you're using skin latex, then yes, it is a common glue and is even in some eyelash adhesives.

Silicone molding is a whole 'nother animal with it's own Pro's and Con's. While silicone can have a wonderful luminosity of skin, it can be more expensive, heavier and more challenging to paint and repair as compared to latex preparations.
Foam latex "breaths". Silicone does not. And then there is Tin vs Platinum silicone... a whole different set of things to learn.

What Ben Nye glue are you using? Are you talking about Spirit Gum? Yes. One can be allergic to Spirit Gum.... What did you use as a remover? As you might have guessed, there may be something in THAT preparation that is the allergen.
How did you remove it? Most removers need time to do their thing. Rushing and scrubbing often do not help and cause more irritation.


Reply
:iconmelesmeles-faber:
melesmeles-faber Featured By Owner Feb 25, 2014  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
I use the same latex on my skin as I do for casting my masks! ;)  It seems to cause no trouble.......

All I know about the Ben Nye I use is that it is white (it is repackaged into a small bottle with little info), the remover is transparent blue...... I didn't enjoy the remover on my skin 100%!!!:(

Spirit Gum I've used once, a long while ago. Instead of carefully removing it ,I tore the mask off my face, which wasn't clever......Slightly red and irritated skin afterwards!  I will try it again, and next time carefully remove it with alcohol.  I don't seem to have much of a problem with alcohol, when using it to degrease my face before applying a prosthetic.

I'll have to try silicone moulding someday!;)
Reply
:iconpixel-spotlight:
Pixel-Spotlight Featured By Owner Jul 14, 2012  Professional Photographer
Just saw you link this on MM Lisa, no clue how I hadn't come across it before.

But this is why I love you. Amongst many other reasons, obviously.
Reply
:iconbattledress:
Battledress Featured By Owner Jul 16, 2012  Professional General Artist
Thank you!

Just one of my rants....

I had several news articles written, but they're kinda hard to find now with the dA move to the Stash thing.
Reply
:iconthefatpirate:
theFATpirate Featured By Owner Apr 6, 2012
i use halloween make-up. it sucks for fine painting and skin isn't a good tooth for it being brushed on, but it shows up well when photographed.

perhaps there is a list of products from top end professional to beginning level? this would be an excellent reference... anyone?
Reply
:iconbattledress:
Battledress Featured By Owner Apr 7, 2012  Professional General Artist
Using halloween makeup can be like trying to paint with crayons... the product quality just is NOT there.

For fine line control, I use WolfeFX - a water activated cake that has great opacity and holds very crisp lines.

www.sillyfarm.com is a great resource for comparison shopping for what the pro community use.

Snazaroo is at the bottom end of the pro lines, I don't recommed it.

Hope that helps.
Reply
:iconthefatpirate:
theFATpirate Featured By Owner Apr 17, 2012
thank you so much. i look forward to getting a hold of some of these products. great analogy for painting with Halloween make-up. i was thinking, "lord there's got to be something better than this crap for delicate work". thanks again
Reply
:iconthefatpirate:
theFATpirate Featured By Owner Apr 17, 2012
thank you so much. i look forward to getting a hold of some of these products. great analogy for painting with Halloween make-up. i was thinking, "lord there's got to be something better than this crap for delicate work". thanks again
Reply
:iconmichelleheffner:
MichelleHeffner Featured By Owner Mar 1, 2012
"Cosmetic ingredients are individually approved by the FDA." Actually, I'm not sure this is true. There is a list of GRAS ingredients (Generally Regarded As Safe) for food substances that is considered a guideline for cosmetic raw materials, but from what I can find there is only a very short list of cosmetic ingredients (raw materials that are not colorants) that are prohibited. No ingredients, aside from colorants, are FDA approved for cosmetic use. Discuss?
Reply
:iconbattledress:
Battledress Featured By Owner Mar 3, 2012  Professional General Artist
I can certainly see where my sentence “Cosmetic ingredients are individually approved by the FDA." is overly broad in scope. There is an approved pigment list (link below) which I refer to when educating on the differences between Craft (Non-Toxic), Cosmetic and Food colorants. The important thing for people to understand is that the list is ever decreasing the closer we get to skin absorption or ingestion.

The FDA certainly is not perfect and has valid criticisms leveled against it. However, it is the best place we have to start when making product use choices that affect the health of OTHER human beings – our models.

FDA Authority over Cosmetics:
“The FD&C Act prohibits the marketing of adulterated or misbranded cosmetics in interstate commerce. “
[link]

Color Additives in Cosmetics:
“Color additives are subject to a strict system of approval under U.S. law…”
[link]

Color Additives Permitted for Use in Cosmetics: Table
[link]

Case Study:
Untitled Letter to BASF Regarding Mica-Based Pearlescent Pigments
[link]
Reply
:icontoberkitty:
toberkitty Featured By Owner Jan 22, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Preach!!! I've had to tell people this soooo many times. Just use makeup as it's intended to be used...not tempera paint, not poster paint or any of that crap! =P
Reply
:iconbattledress:
Battledress Featured By Owner Jan 24, 2012  Professional General Artist
Thank you!

Sadly, if people don't care they'll justify their choices 7 ways to sunday.
I've adjusted my "Soap Box" by adding 2 additional points:

Respect your model.
We're making healthcare decisions for ANOTHER human being.
Reply
:iconchrischaaan:
chrischaaan Featured By Owner Nov 9, 2010   Traditional Artist
I recently went to Laos and found that one of the tubing-fun-bars along Nam Song River in Vang Vieng is offering "bodypaint" as the main event, compared to mudwrestling or a long waterslide in others. People are painting each other with spray paint:
[link]
[link]
[link]
I was surprised to take a spray can in my hand and find out that it was ACRYLIC CAR PAINT. Some is still on my thumb's nail, actually. And some people even painted their faces. Crazy.
Cans were provided by the bar people.
Reply
:iconbattledress:
Battledress Featured By Owner Nov 9, 2010  Professional General Artist
Wow.
Spray can paint has all sorts of solvents in it.
Inhalation is SO not good - let alone prolonged skin contact.

And car paint is even worse...
When I airbrush automotive murals, I'm in a respirator and ventilated booth.

Looks like you had a good time, but definitely something I couldn't get away with!
Reply
:iconchrischaaan:
chrischaaan Featured By Owner Dec 11, 2011   Traditional Artist
I just found a few more pictures and a website about it...

"Spray paint, why not?!" [link]
Large pictures showing the spraypaint cans: [link]
irremovable spray paint after showering: [link]
Reply
:iconmissythemuse:
MissytheMuse Featured By Owner Nov 20, 2009
very clear and concise. EXCELLENT article! Thanks for posting it!!
Reply
:iconcatiescarlett:
catiescarlett Featured By Owner Apr 6, 2009
Really great and well written article. Made me miss my days in drama with more face painting, makeup, etc. *grins* Though, as a first year law student, I gotta admit, my biggest smiles came when I read the refrain of "This is why I have liability insurance." Verrrrry smart!
Reply
:iconmira-mcgrath:
mira-mcgrath Featured By Owner Feb 14, 2009  Professional General Artist
definitely something more people need to read
Reply
:iconmystical-sorceress:
mystical-sorceress Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2009   Photographer
great article!


also
don't put tape over your eyes
it'll leave your eyelids super sticky, even after washing them with soap a couple of times. it's really uncomfortable and it's pretty painful to take off!!!
Reply
:iconporcelainpoet:
PorcelainPoet Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2009
I put black non-toxic acrylic paint in my mouth. Which you can see here: [link] :D

It wasn't so bad.. just tasted nasty. I didn't swallow any of it though. I've also used acrylic paint on my face and body... and yeah.. it's not good for you, but oh well! I'm not dead yet.
Reply
:iconbattledress:
Battledress Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2009  Professional General Artist
I promise, you swallowed some of it.... and the mouth has a much lower barrier threshold than the skin (which is why we can take fast dissolving medications under the tongue).

That being said, the image is cool as hell and you've survived.

There's always more than one way to get a look, but sometimes the BEST way to achieve a look is bound to be the most unconventional.
Reply
:iconporcelainpoet:
PorcelainPoet Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2009
Yeah I'm sure it was probably a stupid thing to do..
but I've gotten pretty messy with some of my photo shoots.
I guess I'm not afraid to push the limits.
But I see how possibly ingesting paint is not really a good thing. Lol.

Thanks for the compliment though! I think putting the paint in my mouth
for that shot was worth it. :giggle:
Reply
:iconsophia-christina:
Sophia-Christina Featured By Owner Jan 27, 2009
great article!!
Reply
:iconskeletonmurderer:
SkeletonMurderer Featured By Owner Jan 26, 2009  Student General Artist
Grease paint, gelatin and spirit gum?
I see a alot of reactions from silicones and adhesives but what about those?
Reply
:iconbattledress:
Battledress Featured By Owner Jan 27, 2009  Professional General Artist
Grease Paint.... I don't hear a lot about reactions to the PRODUCT, but there are specific reactions to a particular PIGMENT (Red, for example).

Gelatin.... I've not heard of a reaction to gelatin in and of itself. More from the adhesives used to apply.

Spirit Gum - Many people are sensitive to this... In my personal experience, almost as often as latex.

This is why I ask a model if they have ANY allergies including food and hay fever. A "sensitive" person, in my own experience, is more likely to be bothered by adhesive tape.

Course, they model will say "No, no. No allergies to anything". Then, half way through a 6 hour paint will say "how easily does this stuff come off? I have very sensitive skin". This AFTER the process and what to expect lecture. Pay attention, much?
Reply
:iconbattledress:
Battledress Featured By Owner Jan 27, 2009  Professional General Artist
Back to Gelatin... it is an animal product. Some models and projects will be Vegan and this can cause a problem.

That is another discussion ;)
Reply
:iconbrigettemora:
BrigetteMora Featured By Owner Jan 22, 2009  Student Filmographer
Oh boy, now I feel ill... I can't tell you how many face paintings I've done at school carnivals and hospital sponsored "Trunk or Treats." I never even thought about illnesses or -gag!- lice being passed about, which I pray never happened. I always washed my brushes between faces, but just with plain water. Oy gevalt, thanks for smacking me about! :faint: At least I haven't done face painting in a few years.
Reply
:iconbattledress:
Battledress Featured By Owner Jan 25, 2009  Professional General Artist
Oh, kids take one dunk in the ball pit at the local burger place and you'll have a far worse exposure risk for lice.

Somehow, my generation survived lawn darts, tree climbing and eating paste and crayons in kindergarten.

It's all about awareness....
Reply
:iconbrigettemora:
BrigetteMora Featured By Owner Jan 26, 2009  Student Filmographer
:faint: True enough!
Reply
:iconpanicmunkeyfx:
panicmunkeyfx Featured By Owner Jan 22, 2009  Professional General Artist
thank you for posting this. I was recently having a similar conversation with a few other FX guys. This answers a few of our questions about the silicone reactions. Great information, thank you for posting it up. It makes me think of getting liability insurance for my company, who should I go thru for that?
Reply
:iconbattledress:
Battledress Featured By Owner Jan 22, 2009  Professional General Artist
Silicone.... yep. Perfect red outline right under where the patch test was. It has to be a rare, because silicone is a MAJOR ingredient in today's foundations, primers, concealers and the like.

Just like everything else in the business, there are many grades of silicone - and some are not rated for use on the skin. Into that whole Tin cure vs. Platinum cure thing.

As to insurance, I'll dig up the link! There are a couple of sources out there. Are you Union? They're another good source of contacts.
Reply
:iconpanicmunkeyfx:
panicmunkeyfx Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2009  Professional General Artist
nope not union yet Im still debating on if its really a good idea for me . Either way Im a long way from meeting my days so Im just saving everything up for now an once Ive got the days then ill make a decision. what about you, are you union?
Reply
:iconbattledress:
Battledress Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2009  Professional General Artist
Nope.... spent some time on film sets and with realty TV following me around. (Well, to be fair, they were following the models around.) Most of my work is on the still photography and event painting side of things.
Reply
:iconpanicmunkeyfx:
panicmunkeyfx Featured By Owner Jan 31, 2009  Professional General Artist
aw yes someday I wanna get good enough to feel confidant doing events. Im actually gunna try to be brave and do the student competition at IMATS this year. Will you be there?
Reply
:iconbattledress:
Battledress Featured By Owner Jan 31, 2009  Professional General Artist
I'll be working for Grex Airbrush... doing demos both days.

Can't wait to see you!

And, we'll have to get together at an Open House... play, play, PLAY!
Reply
:iconpanicmunkeyfx:
panicmunkeyfx Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2009  Professional General Artist
awe fantastic! Im stoked, Ill defiantly come by! See ya then :D
Reply
:iconoilsoaked:
oilsoaked Featured By Owner Jan 22, 2009  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Wonderful and amazing article. Very thorough and in depth.
Reply
:iconcosfrog:
cosfrog Featured By Owner Jan 22, 2009  Professional Photographer
So all that spray paing I invested in for my next shoot with pixie is wasted?
Reply
:iconbattledress:
Battledress Featured By Owner Jan 22, 2009  Professional General Artist
Snark. I'll paint you a mural ;)
Reply
:iconzananeichan:
zananeichan Featured By Owner Jan 22, 2009
Well written, but the problem is when i do body art which I have done, Is i used all general puporse paint and green food colouring, because where I live there is no store that sell products for artistic purposes of painting the skin and secondly I just dont have the money, even dont have money for doing oil paints as traditional art work which I would want to do.
:love:
:hug:
:love:
Reply
:icondoomsday-dawn:
Doomsday-Dawn Featured By Owner Jan 22, 2009
Take it from someone who's made just about every mistake in the book (and then some), we all start somewhere in the artistic journey and learn what we can along the way. I'm totally with you on having the urge to create, but lacking the $$$ and resources for an ideal production.

The point to take away from this is awareness. Know the risks. Not be flippant or careless. Not to mislead or potentially harm a model. It's still up to you and the people you're working with to make a calculated, informed decision. Safer is better.

Judging from your body of work (pun certainly intended) the only person you're really endangering is yourself. At least you know the risks, can take measures to minimize accidents, and don't have to worry about hurting someone else. If you haven't had an allergic reaction to anything you're using (on yourself) then it's probably not a huge risk.

Create. Be safe.
Reply
:iconzananeichan:
zananeichan Featured By Owner Jan 22, 2009
((hugs))
Yes it is important to make sure of the awareness, and I felt food colouring is safe because its food and people eat food, simple and logical. But i had a look at featured deviation, with the eyes, It does get a bit silly to put things to close around eyes besides specialy designed make ups. Shampoo when in the eyes hurt.. what about hair dyes ? that even is more harmfull to eyes if it gets in.Nope, i have not had any allergic reactions to the substances applied to my body :-)
Thank you
:hug:
:heart:
Reply
:iconbattledress:
Battledress Featured By Owner Jan 22, 2009  Professional General Artist
I'm not trying to be a scare monger... buttttttttt....

One thing to add to the caution list... you CAN develop an allergy to something that has not bothered you for years. Some reactions are accumulative. Latex is an example of this.

You hit the nail on the head when comparing Shampoo to food dye. Shampoo is non-toxic, but nasty in the wrong places. Also, the stomach can handle a lot more than our skin can. Hot sauce, anyone?

As to art supplies, you've got a harder go of it because of your location. If it is ANY consolation, I live an hour from Los Angeles, the mecca of all glitz and glamor... and almost ALL my purchases are mail order. Shipping is just less money and hassle than the drive. Ordering liquid alcohol based products can still be a chore because of hazardous shipping restrictions.
Reply
:iconzananeichan:
zananeichan Featured By Owner Jan 23, 2009
Thanks, I know and understand your concerns :hug:
:love:
:heart: :-)

Hmm, i guess if you cannot get the appropriate things one has to be catious. And its logical not to put chilli sauce(hot sauce aka perri perri) in the eyes.
Thank you :hug: I just wish the supplied proper body paints and body art accessories at art stors.. but then being in a small tiney town in a rural area is a problem and being unemployed is another problem.
yes I accept my risks, and have done worse things to myself in my life time, when undergoing extreme depressions while studying for Uni. Mud is a natural thing I should do more too :-) its costless and theraputic :-)
:hug:
:love:
Reply
:iconcoolmarvin:
coolmarvin Featured By Owner Jan 22, 2009  Hobbyist Digital Artist
One of the best article's I've seen. :)
Reply
:iconmisspixie93:
misspixie93 Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2009
Great article! I think there are too many people out there that are willing to apply stuff to models/themselves without checking on the safety level and who go off the the simple premise that non-toxic means it's safe. I confess that I have done so in the past with more craft products than I can remember. I have been lucky enough to have come out of most of those moments safely.
Reply
:iconbattledress:
Battledress Featured By Owner Jan 22, 2009  Professional General Artist
With your pale skin? Geeze. I think I can still see that Battledress logo.....
Reply
:iconmisspixie93:
misspixie93 Featured By Owner Jan 23, 2009
Hahaha! you know it might be there permanently after that sunburn. lol!
Reply
:iconravenseyeart:
RavensEyeArt Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2009
Thank you for the very interesting article :D
Reply
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